Records of the Apter family in the All Galicia Database

There are currently 229 records for the surname Apter (including soundalike names and spelling variants) in the All Galicia Database (the AGD), Gesher Galicia's free searchable collection of genealogical and historical records from the former Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia, which is now eastern Poland and western Ukraine. Here is a sampling of some of the results you can find there:

  • and Ester PERLMAN, daughter of Mendel APTER
    marriage record from Tarnopol Jewish Marriage Banns, Marriage Certificates (1916, 1920-1939)
  • Freide APTER
    1816 death record from Tarnopol Jewish Deaths (1816-1820)
  • Dawid APTER
    1820 property record from Sędziszów Landowners (1820)
  • Dawid APTER
    1820 property record from Sędziszów Landowners (1820)
  • Dawid APTER
    1820 property record from Sędziszów Landowners (1820)
  • [no given name] APTER, son of Ahron and Lea
    1820 death record from Lwów Jewish Deaths (1805-1880)
  • Abrah. APTER, son of Meylech and Chane
    1821 birth record from Tarnopol Jewish Births (1820-1838)
  • Beile ABPTER
    1822 death record from Tarnopol Jewish Deaths (1820-1834)
  • Elie APTER, son of Simon and Fünkel
    1823 birth record from Tarnopol Jewish Births (1820-1838)
  • Schmul ABTER, son of Hirsch and Dresel
    1824 death record from Lwów Jewish Deaths (1805-1880)

Search the All Galicia Database to see the full information available for all 229 records. The AGD is updated with new records every few months, so check back often to see the latest results.

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Records of the Apter family in Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website

There are 158 search results for the surname Apter at Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website, a few of which are listed below. Note that results listed below are limited to purely Galician sources, such as telephone and business directories from Galician cities, or school records, but they do not include the many other sources available on his website that span all of pre-war Poland. You may need the free .DjVu web browser plugin to view these files.

  • Baligrod Yizkor Book (1964), image 420 {y24}
    822 FOREWORD of Suwałk. By 1862, after a series of unsuccessful Polish revolts and the stimulus of an increase in persecution, widespread emigration commenced. Suwałk Jews emigrated to the four corners of the world- Their destinations were such far away strange places as New York, Johannesburg, the Argentine, Hungary, London, Montevideo and the Holy Land. Zionist Suwałk, it can be noted, was the first community to actually send envoys to Pa-lestine to purchase land. It should also be remembered that the immigrants from Suwałk were in the forefront in the migration from Rastern Europe and that it was as a result of their influence and aid ...
  • Baranow Yizkor Book (1964), image 243 {y32}
    ... of friends—children of his own age, and from early childhood he acquired the social habit of adaption and accommodation. The older the child became, the more strenuous his studies and the more severe the discipline. At the age of nine (9) he would rise about 6 A.M. and learn until about 8, davin, go home for breakfast and was off to school. By two (2) P.M. he was back in Cheder until four. Then he was free until after the evening services when another two hour session in Cheder followed. Somewhere in between, the child squeezed in his homework for school and Cheder and enjoyed such relaxation as was available to him. The lot of the girls was easier. They were not required to attend Cheder, neither were they subjected to its discipline. They obtained some private tutoring in Hebrew reading ...
  • Baranow Yizkor Book (1964), image 250 {y32}
    ... the Polish Scjm) were held here in a form of house arrest, as their ideas were held by the politicos to be contrary to the best interests of the country. The "Castle" was "the" landmark of the town. Adjacent to the "Castle" ran the Krzcmcnicc, a beautiful, rapidly flowing streamlet, which meandered its way to the Vistula. Parallel and a mile to its rear rushed the Vistula, the major water artery of the country, which after absorbing many tributaries, made its way to the Baltic Sea. This fortunate geographic location which bestowed on Baranow two streams within its boundaries gave it distinction and stature. Owing to this fact a "Get" (Jewish divorce document) could be processed here, though no one remembered that such document had ever been executed in the community. economy The Jews were ...
  • Baranow Yizkor Book (1964), image 251 {y32}
    ... acclimated themselves to the new environments and settled in the new localities, never to return to Baranow. At the end of the war, Poland's independence was established. With it came oppressive laws undermining the economic position of the Jews. More-over, Polish independence was celebrated in Baranow with pogroms. The young Jews who had returned from the wars quickly organized an effective self defense and after several bloody encounters the pogroms were stopped and order re-established. The post World War I years witnessed a wave of emigration, particularly to America, and the Jewish population dwindled to a mere 125-135 families. geography Baranow is located in what is commonly known as Western Galicia. The county seat (Starostwo) was in Tarnobrzeg (Dzikov) and was part of the province ...
  • Berezhany Yizkor Book (1978), image 479 {y48}
    ... those people and places where we dwelt during the rule of the Nazis. We had a strong desire to get away from the local population, a great majority of whom, gave a helping hand to the murder of the Jews. We were look-ing forward to the day when we would be able to leave that terrifying place, where our lives and the lives of our dear ones were brought to a premature end. Our situation after the liberation, by the Soviets became more difficult than before the Nazi occupation. The non-Jewish population, as well as the Soviet government could not forgive the fact that we remained alive. They saw in us an unwanted remnant. They, as well as we. were waiting for the day when we could leave the place forever. Finally that day arrived. According to on agreement between Poland and the Soviet Union ...

Check out Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website for more search results.

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Gesher Galicia is a non-profit organization carrying out Jewish genealogical and historical research on Galicia, formerly a province of Austria-Hungary and today divided between southeastern Poland and western Ukraine. The research work includes the indexing of archival vital records and census books, Holocaust-period records, Josephine and Franciscan cadastral surveys, lists of Jewish taxpayers, and records of Galician medical students and doctors - all added to our searchable online database. In addition, we reproduce regional and cadastral maps for our online Map Room. We conduct educational research and publish a quarterly research journal, the Galitzianer.

You can search our free All Galicia Database, Map Room, and archival inventories, and read about member benefits starting at $36 per year. You can also join online.

Our general contact address: info@geshergalicia.org