Records of the Grib family in the All Galicia Database

There are currently 493 records for the surname Grib (including soundalike names and spelling variants) in the All Galicia Database (the AGD), Gesher Galicia's free searchable collection of genealogical and historical records from the former Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia, which is now eastern Poland and western Ukraine. Here is a sampling of some of the results you can find there:

  • Abraham GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Adela GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Chaim GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Chaja-Sara GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Chana GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Chawa GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Cipa GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Cudyk GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Elka GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)
  • Estera GREIF, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)

Search the All Galicia Database to see the full information available for all 493 records. The AGD is updated with new records every few months, so check back often to see the latest results.

The Gesher Galicia Family Finder — connect with other people who are researching the Grib family:

There are 9 entries listed in the Gesher Galicia Family Finder for this surname.

Here are the 3 most recent records.

Family & Location Researcher Researcher's Location Date Added
GRAF in
Town Uncertain, Ukraine
GG Member Yarmouth, ME
USA
Jun 30, 2018

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Records of the Grib family in Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website

There are 184 search results for the surname Grib at Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website, a few of which are listed below. Note that results listed below are limited to purely Galician sources, such as telephone and business directories from Galician cities, or school records, but they do not include the many other sources available on his website that span all of pre-war Poland. You may need the free .DjVu web browser plugin to view these files.

  • Chrzanow Yizkor Book (1989), image 415 {y114}
    ... pots to make sure they contained nothing forbidden. Our hearts nearly failed when we heard the tramp of police boots. Many of our women and children actually did succumb to heart attacks caused by terror, a long time before they were suffocated and burned in Auschwitz. Lindner never stopped arranging work details during that period. He continued to demand (or better, to grab) new victims for the German labor camps. After a time only girls were taken, because the young men of Chrzanow didn't allow themselves to be taken so easily. The frequent roundups by the German police often failed to bring the desired results, because the intended victims often reached their hiding places. The inventiveness of these people, who wanted to survive to take vengeance on our torturers, was astonishing ...
  • Chrzanow Yizkor Book (1989), image 434 {y114}
    Before the War GERMAN RULE UNTIL 1940 Around midday on Monday, September 4, 1939, the Nazi hordes entered the city. Their first task was to grab people off the streets—Poles as well as Jews—and incar-cerate them. The Jews were kept in the synagogue, the Poles in church. No one understood the purpose of this action; no one was harmed in any way, and the next day everyone was released. Jews, instinctively sensing what they could expect from the "Master Race," hid at home, afraid to appear on the street. Food shortages began during the first days. Willy-nilly, one had to go outside to look for food, in order to ...
  • Baligrod Yizkor Book (1964), image 422 {y24}
    ... hands of both the German Nazis and the violently Anti-Semitic Polish, Latvian and Lithuanian peasants, was to be paralleled in the history of the treatment given and the attitudes shown to other Jewish communities unfortunate enough to find themselves under the dreadful yoke of Nazi do-mi nation. This volume is a memorial book dedicated not only to those who lived in the Suwałk vicinity, or those who grew up there, or studied there, or served their military duty there, or migrated from there or even perished there, or the descendants of all the foregoing, but it is a lxiok dedicated to World Jewry, not only of this generation but of all generations past. It is a book written with a very familiar theme and a recurring history. The story is as old as the Bible itself. The settlement of Jews ...
  • Baranow Yizkor Book (1964), image 249 {y32}
    ... or open stands which cluttered the "Marek" and thus secured the necessary items for their households. The social status of the Jew in the community usually followed his finan-cial position. But this was not absolute—general erudition, knowledge of the Talmud or "good"' children, would contribute to the elevation of one's status. The social line, in general was not too finely drawn. Laws governing the economy grew steadily more oppressive. No Jews was to get license to sell tobacco. The Jewish saloon keepers found difficulty in having their licenses renewed notwithstanding the intervention of the Jewish members of the Sejm (parliament). In addition, the non-Jewish element made serious attempts to establish businesses. The famous slogan "Swoj do swego'' (Each to his kind) was much exploited ...
  • Berezhany Yizkor Book (1978), image 486 {y48}
    ... . The Ukrainians started exploiting the food storage. In exchange for their products, which were of a very poor quality, they demanded valuable articles from the Jews. The Germans demanded Jews daily for different kinds of work. It was only the Jewish population, which was obligated to fulfill all German demands on the very same day. The demands were not small. The German appetite grew from day to day. In those days, he who worked a day's work, received, besides the beatings, also one loaf of bread. The health situation was frightful. There were hundreds of wounded and sick hospitals would not admit. Dr. Falk and I. with the consent of the head of the Jewish community, opened a Jewish hospital in the community center. Near it. we opened a clinic. We supplied all the necessary furnishings ...

Check out Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website for more search results.

Other ways to connect with people researching the Grib family:

 

Gesher Galicia is a non-profit organization carrying out Jewish genealogical and historical research on Galicia, formerly a province of Austria-Hungary and today divided between southeastern Poland and western Ukraine. The research work includes the indexing of archival vital records and census books, Holocaust-period records, Josephine and Franciscan cadastral surveys, lists of Jewish taxpayers, and records of Galician medical students and doctors - all added to our searchable online database. In addition, we reproduce regional and cadastral maps for our online Map Room. We conduct educational research and publish a quarterly research journal, the Galitzianer. Gesher Galicia is also organized for the purpose of maintaining networking and online discussion groups and to promote and support Jewish heritage preservation work in the areas of the former Galicia.

You can search our free All Galicia Database, Map Room, and archival inventories, and read about member benefits starting at $50 per year. You can also join online.

Our general contact address: info@geshergalicia.org