Records of the Blatt family in the All Galicia Database

There are currently 1918 records for the surname Blatt (including soundalike names and spelling variants) in the All Galicia Database (the AGD), Gesher Galicia's free searchable collection of genealogical and historical records from the former Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia, which is now eastern Poland and western Ukraine. Here is a sampling of some of the results you can find there:

  • Mendel BERGER, spouse of , grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Dębica Area Holocaust-period death testimonies (1939-1944)
  • Helena BLATT, née LIST, spouse of , grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Dębica Area Holocaust-period death testimonies (1939-1944)
  • [no given name], child of and Golde HALPERN
    birth record from Jezierna Jewish Births (1876-1886)
  • Chaia BLAU
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Abraham BLAU
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Bruche BLOCH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Pessie BLEICH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • [infant], son of Schulim BLEICH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Meier BLEICH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Jenta BLAJ, grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Lwów Ghetto Residents (1941-1943)

Search the All Galicia Database to see the full information available for all 1918 records. The AGD is updated with new records every few months, so check back often to see the latest results.

The Gesher Galicia Family Finder — connect with other people who are researching the Blatt family:

There are 5 entries listed in the Gesher Galicia Family Finder for this surname.

Here are the 3 most recent records.

Family & Location Researcher Researcher's Location Date Added
BLATT in
Tyczyn, Poland
GG Member New York, NY
USA
Nov 2, 2019
BLAWET in
Skalat, Poland
GG Member Sherman Oaks, CA
USA
Feb 6, 2015
BLAWET in
Mikulintsy, Ukraine
GG Member Sherman Oaks, CA
USA
Dec 8, 2008

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Records of the Blatt family in Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website

There are 52 search results for the surname Blatt at Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website, a few of which are listed below. Note that results listed below are limited to purely Galician sources, such as telephone and business directories from Galician cities, or school records, but they do not include the many other sources available on his website that span all of pre-war Poland. You may need the free .DjVu web browser plugin to view these files.

  • Bobrka Yizkor Book (1964), image 242 {y80}
    ... and returned to Boiberke. Since his economic condition did not improve, again he was compelled to immigr-ate to the United States where besides being the jester at weddings of his fellow Boiberker, he gave private lessons in the Bible to the growing youngsters of his friends. He also began to write in Yiddish as well as in Hebrew periodic-als. When the Yiddish weekly "Dos Yiddishe Wochcn Blatt," which was published by the Galician landslcit in New York, made changes in its management, Hafner became its editor. I recall one evening when I visited him in his tiny office on Rivington Street on the lower East Side in New York. I found him writing the editorial for the weekly by candlelight, as there was no money to pay the gas bills. In 1895, our oldest brother, Yitzchok Lcib. arrived ...
  • Brzozow Yizkor Book (1984), image 436 {y94}
    ... because the grave was located in the forest. We rented a taxi and arrived at the desti-nation — the grave of our "kdoshim". It was dif-ficult to find the exact location and we were forced to walk several hundred metres before finding the place camouflaged in the forest. When I reached the grave, my whole body began shivering from my discovery. I found that grave par-tially desecrated, the metal plate containing the proper dedication in the Polish language was thrown down. Bones, skulls and skeletons were scattered all over the area, even whole skeletons peered from the deep holes made purposely for the grave. Apparently it was the work of Polish vandals scavenging for treasures of our "kdoshim" who had been resting there for over thirty-eight years. It is very difficult to describe ...
  • Baranow Yizkor Book (1964), image 244 {y32}
    ... of the school population was Jewish. For reasons of safety Jewish children sat together occupying the rear seats—a form of voluntary ghetto. The Jewish children did not get marks commensurate with their scholastic attainments. They were subjected to frequent harangues by the teachers that challenged the morality and integrity of his race and religion. Stories of the Jews using the blood of Christian children for ritual purposes were related by some teachers in the classrooms as historical truths. There was the notorious Wishka, a local girl, daughter of the apothecary who was a teacher of violent anti-Jewish sentiment and imparted them to the class at frequent intervals. When communism was considered a threat to Polish interests, she represented the Jew as a communist. When uncmploy-ment ...
  • Berezhany Yizkor Book (1978), image 490 {y48}
    ... J^denberg and Mrs. A. Milch and other Jewish women, a Jewish womens organization for the protection of these children was organized. In 1920 it changed its name from The Organization of Jewish Women for the Supervision of Orphans to The Socieiy for the Protection of Jewish Orphans. This worthy cause was sup-ported by Brzezany emigrants to the U.S.A. and particularly by the family of Isaac and Rosalie Feld from Philadelphia. Thanks to this aid an Orphans-home was built on Strazhacka street. The majority of the 32 orphans, of both sexes, were taken in and brought up in this home. They received a thorough basic education and in addition an occupational training, so that they could later take care of themselves. This Orphans-home ceased to function when Second World War broke out. The destiny ...
  • Berezhany Yizkor Book (1978), image 500 {y48}
    ... set for the local drivers and porters. All the houses in the center of the town, contained stores or barrooms, owned mostly by Jews. Further north, there was another market, the "Novl-Rynek". This market was much smaller and more neglected, than the market in the center of the town. Zbozova street connected both. On the east side of the street stood the wo floor Jewish communiy center, which was built after the First World-War. North-east and south of the commercial centre extended a number of streets and alleys. On both sides of these streets stood small delapitaited houses. This was the residential section of the poorer Jewish population of the town. On the south side of this quarter stood the big synagogue, a beautiful well decorated structure, which was constructed in the 16th century ...

Check out Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website for more search results.

Other ways to connect with people researching the Blatt family:

 

Gesher Galicia is a non-profit organization carrying out Jewish genealogical and historical research on Galicia, formerly a province of Austria-Hungary and today divided between southeastern Poland and western Ukraine. The research work includes the indexing of archival vital records and census books, Holocaust-period records, Josephine and Franciscan cadastral surveys, lists of Jewish taxpayers, and records of Galician medical students and doctors - all added to our searchable online database. In addition, we reproduce regional and cadastral maps for our online Map Room. We conduct educational research and publish a quarterly research journal, the Galitzianer.

You can search our free All Galicia Database, Map Room, and archival inventories, and read about member benefits starting at $36 per year. You can also join online.

Our general contact address: info@geshergalicia.org