Records of the Bleich family in the All Galicia Database

There are currently 2415 records for the surname Bleich (including soundalike names and spelling variants) in the All Galicia Database (the AGD), Gesher Galicia's free searchable collection of genealogical and historical records from the former Austro-Hungarian province of Galicia, which is now eastern Poland and western Ukraine. Here is a sampling of some of the results you can find there:

  • Mendel BERGER, spouse of , grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Dębica Area Holocaust-period death testimonies (1939-1944)
  • Helena BLATT, née LIST, spouse of , grandchild of , , ,
    Holocaust record from Dębica Area Holocaust-period death testimonies (1939-1944)
  • [no given name], child of and Golde HALPERN
    birth record from Jezierna Jewish Births (1876-1886)
  • Chaia BLAU
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Abraham BLAU
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Chaskel BLECH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Pessie BLEICH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • [infant], son of Schulim BLEICH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Itzig BLECH, son of Asriel BLECH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)
  • Meier BLEICH
    death record from Stanisławów Jewish Deaths (1845-1863)

Search the All Galicia Database to see the full information available for all 2415 records. The AGD is updated with new records every few months, so check back often to see the latest results.

The Gesher Galicia Family Finder — connect with other people who are researching the Bleich family:

There are 24 entries listed in the Gesher Galicia Family Finder for this surname.

Here are the 3 most recent records.

Family & Location Researcher Researcher's Location Date Added
BLECH in
Mariyampil, Ukraine
GG Member Oreland, PA
USA
Aug 28, 2021
BLEIWEISS in
Debica, Poland
GG Member Chesterfield, MO
USA
Jul 22, 2019
BLOCH in
Krakow, Poland
GG Member New York, NY
USA
Mar 2, 2019

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Records of the Bleich family in Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website

There are 190 search results for the surname Bleich at Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website, a few of which are listed below. Note that results listed below are limited to purely Galician sources, such as telephone and business directories from Galician cities, or school records, but they do not include the many other sources available on his website that span all of pre-war Poland. You may need the free .DjVu web browser plugin to view these files.

  • Brzozow Yizkor Book (1984), image 383 {y94}
    192 Moshe would bless the wine in a ringing voice, using a traditional melody full of the "Neshamah Jctherah." Later, in the manner of "govrin Yehuda’in’’ (Jewish gentlemen) he would break off pieces of the challa and hand them around. The *4zmirot’' (songs) ac-companying the meal evoked many memories and took me back tens of years, to the Friday night ceremony in my fathers house. When the spirit was upon him he would dredge up from his memory all kinds of melodies, whether from the Modzitz Has-sidim, mostly sad, or from the Bobov Hassidim, which for some reason always reminded me of marching songs. I remember that a melody sung once ...
  • Baligrod Yizkor Book (1964), image 420 {y24}
    822 FOREWORD of Suwałk. By 1862, after a series of unsuccessful Polish revolts and the stimulus of an increase in persecution, widespread emigration commenced. Suwałk Jews emigrated to the four corners of the world- Their destinations were such far away strange places as New York, Johannesburg, the Argentine, Hungary, London, Montevideo and the Holy Land. Zionist Suwałk, it can be noted, was the first community to actually send envoys to Pa-lestine to purchase land. It should also be remembered that the immigrants from Suwałk were in the forefront in the migration from Rastern Europe and that it was as a result of their influence and aid ...
  • Baligrod Yizkor Book (1964), image 421 {y24}
    ... itself or in the lands to which these Suwałk Jews emigrated. Because of the surrounding forests, the Lithuanians thought that the area would make a perfect place for a penal colony, and so, late in the Dark Ages, Suwałk was founded. In 1336 Poland assumed dominion over Suwałk as the result of the marital union of Polish and Lithuanian royalty■ In 1795 Prussia became Lord and Master of Suwałk and the Prussians ruled until 1807 when Suwałk took on a French flavor under Napoleons1 ... were permitted to settle in the surrounding countryside for centuries There already was a Synagogue in the adjacent town ״f Wilkowishk a› early as 1623. In 1815 Suwałk became a part of the Tzar's empire and remained Russian until the end of World War I when Suwałk once again reverted to Poland. There was an ...
  • Baligrod Yizkor Book (1964), image 422 {y24}
    ... • Suwałk was the first city with any sizeable Jewish community to be conquered and occupied by the Nazi horde. It, no doubt, owes this prominence to its strategic location in the triangular arc! formed by the borders of Poland, Prussia and the Baltic States. The course of events affecting Suwałk Jewry, the stages of humiliation and annihilation at the hands of both the German Nazis and the violently Anti-Semitic Polish, Latvian and Lithuanian peasants, was to be paralleled in the history of the treatment given and the attitudes shown to other Jewish communities unfortunate enough to find themselves under the dreadful yoke of Nazi do-mi nation. This volume is a memorial book dedicated not only to those who lived in the Suwałk vicinity, or those who grew up there, or studied there, or served ...
  • Baranow Yizkor Book (1964), image 241 {y32}
    ... boys who learned in the Bes Midrosh, one of them was elected as Gabai and charged with the responsibilities of this institution. He would make up a list of boys, appointing them to collect money from the Jewish merchants in town. Each boy would have his Friday assigned to him in which to make his rounds. Another list was drawn up designating one boy a week to collect the books strewn on the tables and place them in their respective shelves. The money collected was turned opcr to a treasurer, usually a merchant of good repu-tation. The money was withdrawn only when needed to buy new books or mend the old ones. The purchase of new books was a matter that required serious contempla-tion. For there were always more "necessary" books to buy than there was money with which to buy them. The Gabai ...

Check out Logan Kleinwaks' Genealogy Indexer website for more search results.

Other ways to connect with people researching the Bleich family:

 

Gesher Galicia is a non-profit organization carrying out Jewish genealogical and historical research on Galicia, formerly a province of Austria-Hungary and today divided between southeastern Poland and western Ukraine. The research work includes the indexing of archival vital records and census books, Holocaust-period records, Josephine and Franciscan cadastral surveys, lists of Jewish taxpayers, and records of Galician medical students and doctors - all added to our searchable online database. In addition, we reproduce regional and cadastral maps for our online Map Room. We conduct educational research and publish a quarterly research journal, the Galitzianer.

You can search our free All Galicia Database, Map Room, and archival inventories, and read about member benefits starting at $36 per year. You can also join online.

Our general contact address: info@geshergalicia.org